Guitar Lesson – Major Scale Chord Structure – Chord Deconstruction

Author: Ed Cupler

Chord Triads Example

Guitar chord triads example.

The following chord triads example shows the notes within the c major scale. Click the arrow to display the notes for each of the seven basic chord triads in the c major scale.

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Due to restrictions on Adobe Flash, this lesson is scheduled to be updated.

 

Chord Triads Shapes Example

Guitar chord triads shapes (voicings) example.

This next chord triads example show some different options for the seven basic chord triads in the c major scale. Click the chords name below the guitar neck to display the first voicing. Click “NEXT CHORD SHAPE" to display a different shape or voicing for that chord. Click “Play" to hear the guitar chord.

Due to restrictions on Adobe Flash, this lesson is scheduled to be updated.

Notes

Guitar Lesson Notes

  • Chords will use the notes from the scale you’re using, for example, if you’re using a c major scale the chords will use notes from the c major scale.
  • Basic chord triads use three notes, a root, a third and a fifth
  • The root is usually the lowest note in the chord and is the note from which the chords name is derived. For example, a C chords root is C, a D chords root is D etc.
  • The third is the third note of the scale when counting up from the root note. So, for a C major chord you would count up from the C note, C being one, D would be two and E would be three or the third. For a D minor chord D would be one, E would be two and F would be the third.
  • The fifth is the fifth note of the scale when counting up from the root note. So, for a C major chord you would count up from the C note, C being one, D would be two and E would be three or the third, F note would be forth and G would be the fifth. For a D minor chord D would be one, E would be two and F would be the third, G note would be forth and A would be the fifth.
  • A chords third is the note that determines if a chord is a major or minor chord. A major third will have an interval of two whole steps or four frets from the chords root note. A minor third will have an interval of one and a half whole steps or three frets from the chords root note.

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