Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman guitar lesson

Author: Edward Cupler

Randy Rhoads Diary of a MadmanThis guitar lesson separates Randy Rhoads guitar parts in Diary of a Madman into small easy to understand chunks. From Randy’s the classical guitar intro to the signature Rhoads style neo-classical guitar solo. This masterpiece from Randy Rhoads takes patience and discipline to master.

Intro Part 1

Notes: Randy Rhoads shows off his classical guitar influence in this excerpt. His use of flat 5ths and diminished chords helped shape his sound and set him apart from other guitarists. Randy rushes the tempo of this intro in places increasing the intensity and hold back at others to give the intro to this song a more sinister feel.

Visit Jamplay for guitar lesson subscriptions
Click here to visit Guitartricks.com and start your free trial.

Acoustic Intro

Diary of a Madman acoustic intro

Intro Part 2

Intro Part 2

Randy Rhoads turns up the intensity where the acoustic guitar stops. It’s basically the same pattern as the last eight bars of the acoustic part with the exception of the end where it precedes the first verse with a chromatic chord pattern E F F# then C B#5 and then resolving on the A.

Audio examples:
Normal

Slow

Diary of a Madman tablature part 2

Verse

Verse

This is the tablature for the verses in Diary of a Madman. Randy repeats this pattern twice for each verse while Ozzy sings. This is also the pattern used as the rhythm under Randy’s guitar solo.

Audio examples:
Normal

Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman tablature part 3

Pre Interlude

Pre Interlude

Randy Rhoads leads into the interlude starting with a riff that uses hammer-ons and pull-offs then proceeds into the rhythm which is loosely based on the pattern for the heavy part of the songs intro only rooted on an E minor chord with a few variations.

Audio examples:

Normal

Slow

Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman tablature Interlude Intro

Interlude

Interlude

This tablature for Randy Rhoads guitar interlude in Diary of a Madman is broken up into four parts. This is where Randy slows the pace and Ozzy confirms that he is indeed the madman.

This section starts off the interlude. The first measure, repeated 3 times is an E minor add 9 chord. The fourth measure is a D major add 9. Although these are not the traditional chord shapes you can understand which chords they are if you understand the way chords are constructed. The open strings are E (root), the other notes are G (third) B (fifth) and F# (ninth).

Audio examples:

Normal

Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman Interlude part 1

Randy plays the second part very similar to the first part but the second measure uses a C as the root note instead of an E. The fourth measure is the same as the fourth measure of the first part.

Audio examples:

Normal

Randy Rhoads Interlude part 2

This is where the Ozzy starts to sing. Rhoads basically plays the same E minor add 5 chord and a D major chord using an open D string as it’s root. There are also a few notes played over the D chord.

Audio examples:

Normal

Randy Rhoads Interlude part 3

This is the same as the above example with a descending chord riff over the D chord instead of single notes.

Audio examples:

Normal

Randy Rhoads Interlude part 3 variation

Post Interlude

Post Interlude

Randy Rhoads leads out of the interlude and into the guitar solo with a lead in riff is identical to the lead in for the “Interlude Intro" section. Then it uses barre chords resolving on a melodic riff that repeats four times before the song proceeds into the solo.

Audio examples:

Normal

Slow

Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman tablature post interlude part 1

The pattern below is repeated four times.

Randy Rhoads Diary of a Madman tablature post interlude part 2

Guitar Solo

Diary of a Madman Guitar Solo

This Randy Rhoads guitar solo from Diary of a Madman is one of my favorite guitar solos. The use of an exotic guitar scale coupled with the deep reverb creates a mood that fits this song perfectly. Displaying not only Randy’s guitar technique but also his song writing ability and musical maturity. As I said, this solo uses an unusual scale, (A B C D# E F G#) basically an A Harmonic Minor scale with an augmented 4th (D#). For the last part he uses a traditional pentatonic scale for a quick standard rock lick. I included the rhythm track with no solo for practice purposes.

Guitar Solo Backing Track

 

Diary of a Madman guitar solo

Visit Jamplay for guitar lesson subscriptions
Click here to visit Jamplay.com
  • Title 1
  • Title 2
  • Content goes here .. (1)

  • Content goes here .. (2)